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What will happen if I wrote a check to myself for $400 and withdrew $100?

I deposited a $400 check that I wrote to myself and withdrew $100. Am I in trouble and if so what can happen? I'm paying the money tomorrow.


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    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    5005 Lapeer Rd
    Burton, MI 48509
    (810) 743-2960
    This is called check kiting if there were no real funds deposited. It is a crime. Get a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan - Replied: 2/16/2013
    Robert Scott | Law office of Robert D. Scott
    PO Box 247
    Mount Rainier, MD 20712
    (301) 864-8611
    If you knew you did not have the money when you deposited the check, you could be prosecuted for Bank Fraud , which is a Felony.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland - Replied: 2/15/2013
    John Hugger | Attorney & Counselor at Law
    3002 Evergreen Parkway
    Evergreen, CO 80437-0877
    (303) 670-1043
    If it was on your own account and you had sufficient funds - no problem.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado - Replied: 2/15/2013
    Timothy J. Thill | Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    261 E. Quincy ST
    Riverside, IL 60546
    (708) 443-1200
    Pay the money back right away, if the checking account was closed or did not have funds to cover the amount withdrawn. You engaged in check kiting, which is a form of theft by deception, which could end up in being made into a criminal charge against you. In no case, don't try this trick again.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois - Replied: 2/14/2013
    Marshall Tauber | Law Offices of Marshall Tauber
    39520 Woodward Ave., Suite 230
    Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304
    (877) 682-8237
    Your check might bounce or you might get an overdraft notice from your bank and be charged a fee for having insufficient funds in your account at the time the check was paid. This is not a criminal act it is a stupid financial decision that can be reported on your credit history and cost you unnecessary banking fees.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan - Replied: 2/14/2013
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