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What is a deferred sentence?

I'm not familiar with the legal term and I don't have an attorney. What does it mean and how might it apply to a legal case? I'm being charged with a felony.


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    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    5005 Lapeer Rd
    Burton, MI 48509
    (810) 743-2960
    It means that they put off sentencing the person and see how he does in the meantime this can affect the ultimate sentence. Sometimes it is done when the judge is waffling on send the person away.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan - Replied: 3/9/2013
    Kevin H Pate | Kevin H Pate
    P.O. Box 337
    Norman, OK 73070-0337
    (405) 928-3398
    In some instances, a person may be allowed to enter a plea of guilty and the prosecution recommend sentencing be deferred rather than imposed immediately. When the court agrees to do so, the plea is accepted, but the court defers taking further action for a period of ten (up to ten years in Oklahoma.). During the deferral period, the defendant has certain conditions to meet, e.g., paying court costs, restitution if applicable, fines, any applicable probation or supervision fees, and any required program fees, treatment, anger management, substance assessments, etc. etc. At the conclusion of the deferral period, provided the defendant successfully met all requirements and paid all required fees and expenses, the Court will dismiss the case instead of imposing a Judgment and sentence on the earlier plea. Upon application, in OK under state law, the matter can then be expunged from the public record. When a certified copy of the expungment is provided to the OSBI, their records of the original arrest are changed to reflect arrested on X date, plead not guilt, case dismissed on DD/MM/YYYY. To expunge the arrest record itself is governed by other statutes, and there are separate requirements which must be met before it can take place.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma - Replied: 3/8/2013
    William L. Welch, III | William L. Welch, III Attorney
    111 South Calvert Street
    Baltimore, MD 21045
    (410) 385-5630
    Sometimes sentencing does not happen on the same day as a guilty finding. Also sometimes courts will want a defendant to accomplish certain things before it imposes sentence.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland - Replied: 3/8/2013
    Patrick Owen Earl | Patrick Earl Attorney
    1334 S. Pioneer Way
    Moses Lake, WA 98837
    (509) 750-9921
    If you are allowed to do a deferred sentence (which is unlikely in Superior Court) this means that the actual sentence for the charge is deferred for a period of time so that you can do some condition and/or not do other conditions and then in the end the case is dismissed, amended to a lower charge or something.
    Answer Applies to: Washington - Replied: 3/8/2013
    Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr. | Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    130 North Cherry #201
    Olathe, KS 66061
    (913) 764-9700
    It generally means that the actual sentencing (jail time/prison time/fines) decision is temporarily set aside.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas - Replied: 3/8/2013
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