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I committed a crime of sorts while sleep-walking, how does this get handled?

I suffer from a sleep-walking disorder, one that plagues me nearly every night, sometimes worse than others. During this sleep-walking, I have been known to function as i would during the day, using electronics, walking places, etc. During this last sleep-walking incident however, it would seem I used my car. I have no recollection of the incident ever taking place. All I know is that I went into work the next day and my boss told me an officer contacted him asking me to come in on a Hit and Run. I'm now freaking out because I don't remember any of it, not to say it didn't happen. What are my options in a case like this?


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    Brendan M. Kelly | Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    1700 Farnam Street, Suite 2820
    Omaha, NE 68102
    (402) 455-1711
    You really need to talk with a lawyer about a defense. You can look at your car and see if it was in an accident. The longer you wait the worse it will be.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska - Replied: 5/21/2013
    William L. Welch, III | William L. Welch, III Attorney
    111 South Calvert Street
    Baltimore, MD 21045
    (410) 385-5630
    Automatism might be a defense, but you would have to get a doctor to confirm that you suffer from it. In addition you might still be responsible, if you knew about it and did not take steps to deal with it. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you evaluate the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to go to trial. Consider seeking a confidential consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland - Replied: 5/21/2013
    A. Bowden Houser | The Houser Law Firm, P.C.
    1007 Hargett Street
    Jacksonville, NC 28540
    (910) 333-9679
    Some crimes require intent and some don't. So it is possible for you to be convicted even though you had no intent or even knowledge the crime was committed. In most states a good example of this is speeding. Speeding requires neither knowledge you were doing it or even intended to do it - all the state has to prove is that you in fact did do it. Consult with an experienced criminal attorney to see what your options are.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina - Replied: 5/21/2013
    Randy W. Ferguson | Ferguson & Ferguson
    303 Williams Avenue SW Ste 321
    Huntsville, AL 35801
    (256) 534-3435
    Hire an attorney and do not talk to police.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama - Replied: 5/20/2013
    Steve Freeborn | Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    33400 9th Avenue S. Suite 208
    Federal Way, WA 98003
    (253) 838-4477
    Hire an attorney to help you.
    Answer Applies to: Washington - Replied: 5/20/2013
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