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Homicide in America

The number of homicides in America is something people worry about, and plan their lives around. Do you want to live in a city known for its high mortality rate? Probably not.


Take a look at the infographic below to see how safe your state is. Also, learn interesting criminal defense facts and figures; for example, do you know how many gambling-related murders there are per annum? Find out, below!

homicide rates by city and state

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Homicide in America

Most homicides happen in major cities. The number next to each city name indicates cases of murders and non-negligent manslaughter in 2009.

  • Albuquerque, NM: 110
  • Atlanta: 140
  • Aurora, CO: 70
  • Baltimore: 370
  • Boston: 80
  • Buffalo, NY: 220
  • Chicago: 160
  • Cincinnati: 160
  • Cleveland, OH: 200
  • Dallas: 130
  • Detroit: 400
  • Fresno, CA: 90
  • Ft. Worth, TX: 60
  • Glendale, AZ: 70
  • Greensboro, NC: 90
  • Houston: 130
  • Indianapolis: 120
  • Jacksonville, FL: 120
  • Kansas City, MO: 210
  • Las Vegas: 80
  • Long Beach, CA: 90
  • Los Angeles: 80
  • Louisville, KY: 110
  • Miami: 140
  • Milwaukee: 120
  • Memphis: 200
  • Nashville: 130
  • Newark, NJ: 290
  • New Orleans: 520
  • New York City: 60
  • Oakland, CA: 260
  • Oklahoma City: 210
  • Philadelphia: 200
  • Phoenix: 80
  • Pittsburgh, PA: 200
  • Portland, OR: 30
  • San Fransisco: 60
  • Seattle: 40
  • St. Louis: 400
  • Stockton, CA: 110
  • Virginia Beach, VA: 40
  • Washington, DC: 240

In 2009, there were 13,636 homicides in the USA, including 1 sniper attack, 28 murders by babysitters, 5 gambling-related murders, and 87 murders related to romantic triangles.

Homicide rates have declined considerably in recent decades. The anomalous 2001 rate includes the 9/11 terrorism attacks.

Experts attribute the decline to better crime-mapping technology, increases in community outreach programs, and the absence of the drug-related gang wars that plagued the ’80s and ’90s.

Presented by Total Criminal Defense


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